If you have ever gone to an educational technology conference, it seems that every teacher there is a technology expert. The presenters and workshop leaders explain how easy their technology is and how much it improves student learning. Many teachers I’ve talked to, especially ones new to technology, come away feeling excited by new possibilities but also a little deflated because of the sheer volume of possibility.

If all of the new technologies were that easy, why isn’t everyone using them? Part of the reason, I believe, is that there are so many technologies available. Teachers can’t be experts at all of them. The prevailing opinion of many technology folks is that teachers need more and more technology. It’s true that many aspects regarding technology are relatively simple. Users have menus and boxes to click the various options–it’s all right in front of them, right? The sad reality is that unless you have already learned which box to check or which menu to select, it doesn’t matter. Implementing new technology takes time, energy, and effort. And these are scarce resources in the teaching world. So what is a teacher or instructional technology specialist to do?

Leverage your talents.

What I mean by this is that you need to  take advantage of the wide variety of technology skills in your school. Everyone doesn’t have to be a “blog expert.” You just need one or two. Find someone on your staff who is or can become the expert on one technology. They do what I call the “heavy lifting”–they research good blog tools, they learn how to set up accounts and find out which check boxes to select, and they learn how to effectively integrate blogs into the classroom. Then you leverage their talents during Staff Development time. They help teach the rest of the staff. If you have a core set of technology tools and a core group of experts who can help others, you will be on your way to tackling the mountains of technology available. And you will have success.

Teachers don’t have to become technology experts. By leveraging training and support, schools and instructional technology specialists can achieve much more.

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