Posts Tagged students

Talk About Lost Opportunity

When I think about all of the things in technology to discuss, it’s almost overwhelming. Probably the one topic that leaps to the top of my mind is “lost opportunity.” There are so many chances to help teachers integrate technology effectively into their classrooms. However, much of the time, it doesn’t happen.

I just spoke today with a colleague who was part of a year-long technology education program. He wanted to do something new professionally and he wanted to challenge his students. However, after a year in a very “forward-thinking and collaborative technology group,” he only came away with one or two lessons. That and a laptop. (Not surprisingly, the promise of a laptop was the main draw for many who joined this program.) In the end, the main obstacle to effective change in his classroom was time. He told me that it was too difficult to learn the software, to teach it to all of his students and then to teach them how to use it to demonstrate understanding of a concept. For him, it wasn’t worth it.

Unfortunately, there are hundreds of teachers who feel the same way. So what can educational leaders do? They can listen to their teachers. Often the leaders of schools listen disproportionately to the many “technology experts” that promote the use of this tool or that tool. Too often these experts aren’t in the classroom anymore. They spend much of their time learning about new technologies and teaching others. That’s a fine thing to do. But to be most effective, they need to be in the classroom on a regular basis–not just for quick visits but full-time. Then they would know and understand the difficult realities of integrating new technology into the classroom.

Seasoned technology specialists who still teach can help other teachers implement technology effectively in their classrooms. They can help turn lost opportunity into real possibility.

Share

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

No Comments

The Role of Technology in Education

So many people espouse the many benefits of technology in education. Sometimes it seems like the so-called “experts” are getting kickbacks from the technology industry. So, how do you tell if a new technology is actually worth the time, money and effort? Here’s how I judge new technologies.

There are two things that technology should and must do if it’s to be found in the classroom. One is that it must increase student learning. Now I’m not one of those folks who emphasize the difference between “teaching” and “learning.” In other languages, these two words are one in the same. So, when I talk about student learning, that includes anything that helps teachers teach better and students learn better.

The other main purpose of technology in education is to help reduce the workload of teachers and students. This seems like a fairly straight-forward request. However, you’d be amazed how many new technologies have been introduced but no one has given an ounce of thought to how it impacts the teacher or student. Sometimes “time-saving technologies” actually add hours to the end users. What they usually do is save someone else’s time. ¡No bueno!

So if you hear about a technology that just “has to be in your school,” ask for specific details about two things: the impact on student learning and the work-load reduction. If they promise things that are beyond your wildest dreams, they may be trying to sell you something.

Share

Tags: , , , , ,

No Comments

Who Should You Call? 911 or Facebook?

A recent event highlights a critical need for adults to help young people navigate the new digital world that we’ve created. Two girls who were lost in a storm drain decided that they should update their Facebook status instead of call for help. Read the story here at ABC News-Australia. It’s imperative that teachers and parents step up to the plate and help young people understand how to use new technology appropriately. We can’t sit on the sidelines and “let the kids figure it out.” We created this technology–it’s our responsibility that it’s used correctly.

Share

Tags: , , , , , ,

1 Comment

Adults and New Technology

One thing that many adult users of technology tell me is that they don’t pick up new technology like younger folks do. This is a common misbelief. I think the core issue has nothing to do with “young brains” or “digital natives” or even the “technology today.” I’ve used technology to teach every age group from adults to elementary students. There are two main differences. The first is that kids aren’t afraid of breaking things. That’s a good thing when trying something new but it’s a bad thing for those of you who are parents. Kids dive right in and begin using new technology-whatever it is.

The other main difference between how kids and adults use technology has to do with the fact that adults are used to being proficient. We pick up a pencil and we know what to do. When we get in a car, we know what to do. The list goes on and on. That’s a good thing-we’ve had a lot of time to learn about the world. However, when we encounter a new technology, there is a hesitation. Sometimes we feel as if we should already know how to work this thing. Adults want to be or at least appear to be proficient. Kids on the other hand are used to being novices. When kids see or work with something new, it’s just another day for them. Their whole world is series of new events, places, things, and ideas.

As adults, we can learn from the kids. When we encounter a new technology, we need to resist the fear of breaking it. Go ahead, play around, push all of the buttons, see what it can do. You won’t break it, I promise. Also, don’t expect to be an expert. Adults sometimes are so used to being the expert that we forget what it’s like to try something new. So go ahead, try something novel. Capture within yourself an adventurous spirit and dive into a new technology. You won’t regret it, I promise.

Share

Tags: , , ,

No Comments

Stick Art Club Rocks!

What a Great Club

What a Great Club

Check out the latest work: http://www.mrpahs.com/stick-art-club/

Share

Tags: , ,

1 Comment

Dive Right In!

Although I’ve written about technology in education in a variety of formats, I’ve never had my own blog. So, here it is.  I now stand with my students in the public world of the internet.

Share

Tags: ,

No Comments